Cap Henning ill16 Altruism Award

The Cap Henning Altruism Award is intended to recognize members of Triangle Fraternity who have made an exemplary contribution to a better world through one or more of the following:

  • The Cap Henning Altruism Award is intended to recognize members of Triangle Fraternity who have made an exemplary contribution to a better world through one or more of the following:
    • As with Cap Henning, exemplary contribution of a member’s time and energy to an altruistic cause not related to his profession;
    • Exemplary contribution of a member’s time and energy using his professional skills for an altruistic cause.
  • Nomination Process: Any member of Triangle may nominate a Triangle Brother for the Cap Henning Altruism Award. The nomination shall be written and shall include a summary of the individual’s contributions.
  • Award Process: The Cap Henning Altruism Award shall be awarded upon a majority vote by the members of National Council. The National President or his designee shall present the award in a manner that is fitting and appropriate. Notice of the award shall be placed in Triangle Review and delivered to each chapter and alumni organization to be read and recorded.
  • Comments: In general, the Cap Henning Altruism Award shall be given to no more than one member per year.

About Cap Henning ill16

Caspar Ferdinand “Cap” Henning ill16, the namesake of this honor,  washed dishes in order to attend the University of Illinois his freshman year.  The following year (1916), with an assist from home, he joined Triangle Fraternity.  After graduation, Cap worked for a Chicago consulting firm, and in 1923, registered at the Moody Bible Institute where he graduated four years later.  He moved careers to the Manufacturers Mutual Fire Insurance Company where he worked as a mechanical engineer.  When he retired from Manufacturers Mutual in 1965 he was the vice president of the company.  Before he retired, Cap worked at his office during the day, then after hours at the Pacific Garden Mission and Gideons International.   The Mission served as a shelter in a rough section of Chicago.  Cap served those who attended the shelter – some homeless, some women and children, some seeking refuge because of family troubles – by giving them something to eat for free, provided a clean bed, and a fresh change of clothing.  While at the Mission, Cap ministered to the bodies, minds, and souls of those who sought shelter.  He quickly advanced to the board of Pacific Garden Mission.  Prior to his death, Cap served as Chairman of the board of the Mission and devoted his career to serving those in need.

Recipients

2014